Thursday, January 25, 2007

Influential Environment

The walrus explains that the influential environment is not only the person's involuntary surroundings, the activities for which he has no control, the events of the universe that occur without consulting the individual. The influential environment consists of those things that are fixed, and those that are fluid. It is also made of the flow of elements generated by the actions and choices of people, and the compounding impacts of environmental elements that intersect with others. The influential environment is then naturally refined by the many choices made deliberately after careful consideration, or quickly and with little forethought, by each individual. And the final cut is made by the individual being influenced.

Start with the uncontrolled elements of the influential environment. A person's family, his general time and location on the planet, the general description of his body, and other peoples' uncontrolled elements, are all factors that create the framework for the controllable portion of the influential environment.

The choices of others, limited by parameters set by their uncontrolled elements, adds color to the environment. We are all separate beings, and therefore must find and create our own course of action. That action is not without consequences in the environment. A person continues through the course of his life with little consideration of the impact of his daily decisions on the environment. But his path, his unstoppable momentum, causes ripples that disturb the environmental waters and others cannot avoid the ripples as they follow their own paths.

A person cannot avoid another person's ripple, another person's impact on the environment, if his path intersects the ripple any more than he can stop time. And the effect of one person on the environment is altered by the effect of another, and his was altered by another, and so on. At any point in time, a person must encounter countless layers of many peoples impact on their environment at varying degrees of volume, that is, the number of ripples impacting a person at any one time.

Humans are endowed with the ability to filter some of the environment so that some of the impact has greater effect on them than others. If a person chooses to be receptive to the impact of one group of elements in the environment that is mutually exclusive to another group of elements, then the desired elements may make more of an impact than the less desirable elements.

The walrus explained it with an example of a gold miner sifting the creek silt for nuggets of gold. The sand and dirt do not settle as quickly as the gold in the miner's pan. He can slosh out the unwanted material and keep the gold. Even if the gold is in smaller particles, it separates from the sand and dirt and settles to the bottom of the pan. The miner can then separate the large nuggets of gold from the small ones, and put them in separate bags, and throw out the sand and dirt. But in order to find the gold, he must scoop up all of the material in the creek bed. He cannot get the gold without the sand and dirt. But what if the gold miner turns out to be a sand and dirt miner? Isn't the same system of selection effective? Of course!

A person consciously and unconsciously is influenced by elements of the environment according to his long and short term choices. And that influence slides along a scale of impact; no element is completely ignored and no element can completely dominate. A person cannot keep from being influenced by the environment, but a person does have input into the the level of influence that the environment will have, if that is his choice.

Labels: , ,